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Report

The 1991-92 Budget: Perspectives and Issues

February 27, 1991 - (308 pages, 13 MB) As the Legislature faces deliberations on the 1991-92 budget, the combination of underlying structural imbalances and a downturn in the California economy has resulted in an estimated two-year budget funding gap of almost $10 billion. The Governor's Budget seeks to address the budget problem through a combination of proposals to reduce existing state services and increase revenues, and contains a number of "prevention" proposals aimed at reducing the cost of existing services in future years. However, the Governor's budget does not fully address the funding gap and also raises concerns regarding its impacts on health and welfare program users, schools, and other affected groups. Ultimately, the Legislature must craft a plan that balances the need for state services with the need to address the state's underlying structural budget problem.

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California's AFDC Program: Current Trends, Issues, and Options

February 13, 1991 - In this analysis, we document the recent increases in caseload and welfare dependency in the AFDC-FG Program and identify the factors contributing to this trend. We then examine various options—including the administration's proposal—which are available to the Legislature to help control the program's costs and reduce welfare dependency.

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State Rail Program

February 1, 1991 - In this analysis, we (1) provide background on the state's existing rail system, how rail systems have been financed up until 1990, and the key features of the new rail programs financed by bond funds; (2) review the state's role in the planning, development, and implementation of the state's rail system; (3) discuss the coordination of the state's rail capital outlay programs; and (4) review issues related to two future rail bond measures scheduled for the November 1992 and 1994 elections.

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Analysis of the 1991-92 Budget Bill: Summary of Findings and Recommendations

February 1, 1991 - In the Analysis of the 1991-92 Budget Bill, we report the results of our detailed examination of the Governor's departmental spending proposals for the coming fiscal year. By contrast, The 1991-92 Budget: Perspectives and Issues provides an overall perspective on the state's revenues and expenditures for the budget year. It also looks to the future in an effort to focus on some of the challenges facing California in the years ahead. This document summarizes, by program area, the principal findings and recommendations set forth in the Analysis and the Perspectives and Issues.

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The County-State Partnership

February 1, 1991 - Over the past several years, many of California's counties have experienced increasing financial stress. While Butte County is perhaps the most visible example of recent county financial troubles, our analysis indicates that the problem is inherent to the existing arrangement of state and county responsibilities and affects all counties to greater or lesser extent. The existing county-state partnership suffers from a variety of structural problems—such as program fragmentation, counter-productive fiscal incentives, and the inappropriate division of responsibilities—that both diminish the effectiveness of these programs and reduce the financial viability of county governments

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Migrant Farmworker Housing

February 1, 1991 - Migrant Farmworker Housing

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State and Local Agencies' Use of Housing Revenue Bonds

February 1, 1991 - State and Local Agencies' Use of Housing Revenue Bonds

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Year-Round School Incentives

February 1, 1991 - Year-Round School Incentives

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Proposition 98

February 1, 1991 - Proposition 98 provides K-12 schools and community colleges with a constitutionally guaranteed minimum level of funding in 1988-89 and thereafter. Under the provisions of this measure, funding requirements for K-14 education programs are determined using a series of complex calculations based on factors related to both workload-based needs and state revenue availability.

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School Restructuring in California

February 1, 1991 - Concerns over current levels of educational achievement combined with perceived limitations of current reform strategies, have resulted in proposals for new approaches to schooling. These new approaches are known collectively as "school restructuring." In practice, the term "restructuring" has been used by various groups to advance different visions of reform. However, boiled down to its essential components, school restructuring involves decentralization of authority and increased collaborations at the local level, in conjunction with enhanced accountability.

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Strategies for Addressing The State's Budgetary Imbalance

February 1, 1991 - Strategies for Addressing The State's Budgetary Imbalance

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California's Economic and Demographic Environment

February 1, 1991 - California's Economic and Demographic Environment

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Community Corrections

February 1, 1991 - Expenditures to support the state's growing prison and parole populations continue to increase at a rapid rate. In addition, the state currently has a limited range of punishment options for many criminal offenders. One potential way to address this growing population in a more effective way is through "community corrections" programs. This approach involves the use of intermediate sanctions as an alternative to state prisons.

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State Infrastructure

February 1, 1991 - In this analysis, we examine some of the major infrastructure- related problems facing the Legislature. These include: (1) identifying the state's infrastructure needs; (2) setting priorities to meet these needs; (3) assessing the state's ability to finance additional bonded indebtedness needed for infrastructure; and (4) establishing a financing plan to carry out the Legislature's priorities, including the extent and timing of future bond measure submittals to the voters.

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Uses of State Bond Proceeds

February 1, 1991 - The state is faced with a large and growing need to revitalize and expand its infrastructure. As discussed in the preceding analysis, doing this requires that it rely on bonds as a financing source. As the state continues to increase its use of bonds for capital projects, it becomes even more important that the bond funds be used in ways that maximize their effectiveness in achieving the state's capital outlay goals.