Propositions on the November 6, 2018 Ballot

Proposition 7

November 6, 2018

 

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AB 807 (Chapter 60, Statutes of 2018), Chu. Daylight saving time.

Yes/No Statement

A YES vote on this measure means: The Legislature, with a two-thirds vote, could change daylight saving time if the change is allowed by the federal government. Absent any legislative change, California would maintain its current daylight saving time period (early March to early November).

A NO vote on this measure means: California would maintain its current daylight saving time period.

Summary of Legislative Analyst’s Estimate of Net State and Local Government Fiscal Impact

  • This measure has no direct fiscal effect because changes to daylight saving time would depend on future actions by the Legislature and potentially the federal government.

Ballot Label

Fiscal Impact: This measure has no direct fiscal effect because changes to daylight saving time would depend on future actions by the Legislature and potentially the federal government.

Background

Federal Law Establishes Daylight Saving Time for Part of the Year. Federal law establishes a standard time zone for each area of the U.S. For example, California and other western states are in the Pacific Standard Time zone. Federal law requires the standard time of each zone to advance by one hour from early March to early November—a period known as Daylight Saving Time (DST). During DST, sunrises and sunsets occur one hour later than they otherwise would. Currently, federal law does not allow states to adopt year-round DST. However, federal law allows states to opt out of DST and remain on standard time all year, as is currently the case in Arizona and Hawaii.

California Voted on DST About 70 Years Ago. In 1949, California voters approved an initiative measure which established DST in California. The Legislature can only make changes to that initiative measure by submitting those changes to the voters for their approval.

Proposal

Proposition 7 allows the Legislature with a two-thirds vote to change DST (such as by remaining on DST year-round), as long as the change is allowed under federal law. Until any such change, California would maintain the current DST period.

Fiscal Effects

No Direct Fiscal Effects on State and Local Governments. The measure would have no direct effect on state and local government costs or revenues. This is because any impacts would depend on future actions by the Legislature—and potentially the federal government—to change DST.

Potential Impacts of Changes to DST. If the Legislature changed DST, there could be a variety of effects. For example, if the Legislature approved year-round DST, sunrises and sunsets would occur one hour later between November and March. Such a change could affect the net amount of energy used for lighting, heating, and cooling during those months. In addition, the current system of DST during part of the year likely affects the amount of sleep some people get when switching between standard time and DST twice a year. This potentially affects such things as worker productivity and the number of accidents. Year-round DST would eliminate these effects. The net effect of such changes on state and local government finances is unclear, but would likely be minor.