State Budget Condition Publications

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Report

State Fiscal Picture 1994-95

February 23, 1994 - The 1994-95 Governor's Budget recognizes that the two-year budget plan adopted last June has been undermined by the continuing stubborn state recession. Faced with an $8 billion budget funding gap for 1993-94, the Legislature and Governor adopted a two-year plan to achieve a balanced budget in 1994-95. That plan now is $4.9 billion out of balance based on the state's current revenue and spending trends identified in the 1994-95 Governor's Budget. Perhaps the most important policy proposal in the budget is the Governor's plan for restructuring the state/county fiscal relationship, which is intended to give counties a significant cost share in the health and welfare programs that they administer in order to provide appropriate incentives to make those programs more efficient and effective.

Report

Perspectives on the Economy 1994-95

February 23, 1994 - Much of the blame for the state's continuing budget shortfalls over the past three years can be placed on the dismal performance of the California economy. The substantial population increases of recent years have maintained constant upward pressure on demands for state services. At the same time, declining employment levels, lower real per capita incomes, and falling property values have limited the ability of the state's major revenue sources to meet these demands. Despite substantial gains in the national economy over the past year, economic activity in most regions of California continues to decline or stagnate.

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Perspectives on State Expenditures 1994-95

February 23, 1994 - The Governor's Budget proposes spending $52.5 billion from the General Fund and state special funds in 1994-95, as shown in Figure 1. This expenditure level is only slightly more than estimated current-year spending of $52.3 billion—an increase of $228 million, or 0.4 percent. General Fund spending shown in the budget declines by 1.4 percent, while spending from special funds increases by 6.1 percent. However, as we discuss in greater detail later in this part, this reflects a shift in how programs are financed rather than a change in program spending priorities or in underlying revenue trends. This shift in financing results from the Governor's state-county restructuring proposal.

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Perspectives and Issues 1994-95

February 23, 1994 - The 1994-95 Governor's Budget recognizes that the two-year budget plan adopted last June has been undermined by the continuing stubborn state recession. Faced with an $8 billion budget funding gap for 1993-94, the Legislature and Governor adopted a two-year plan to achieve a balanced budget in 1994-95. That plan now is $4.9 billion out of balance based on the state's current revenue and spending trends identified in the 1994-95 Governor's Budget.

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Analysis of the 1994-95 Budget Bill

February 23, 1994 - Analysis of the 1994-95 Budget Bill

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Overview of the Governor's Budget 1994-95

January 1, 1994 - The 1994-95 Governor's Budget recognizes that the two-year budget plan adopted last June has been undermined by the continuing stubborn state recession. Faced with an $8 billion budget funding gap for 1993-94, the Legislature and Governor adopted a two-year plan to achieve a balanced budget in 1994-95. That plan now is $4.9 billion out of balance based on the state's current revenue and spending trends identified in the 1994-95 Governor's Budget.

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Performance Budgeting: Reshaping The State’s Budget Process

October 25, 1993 - Performance Budgeting: Reshaping The State’s Budget Process

Report

The 1993-94 Budget Act and Related Legislation

September 1, 1993 - This report summarizes the fiscal effect of the 1993 Budget Act (Ch 55/93, SB 80), including the effects of major legislation that was enacted as part of the overall state spending plan for 1993-94. Our review indicates that the recently enacted two-year budget plan is now out of balance due to a variety of budget adjustments. These adjustments, reflecting actions or decisions that already have occurred, increase spending over the two years by a total of $660 million, which results in a 1994-95 ending deficit of $560 million in the General Fund, absent corrective action, rather than the $100 million reserve that was projected by the Administration when the budget was adopted.

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Supplemental Report of the 1993 Budget Act

August 31, 1993 - Supplemental Report of the 1993 Budget Act

Report

California Update: 1993-94 Budget Enacted

July 1, 1993 - California Update: 1993-94 Budget Enacted

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Focus Budget 1993: Highlighting Major Features of the 1993 California Budget

July 1, 1993 - On June 30, Governor Wilson signed the 1993 Budget Act and various companion measures that, together, comprise the 1993-94 budget package. These measures authorize total state spending of $52.1 billion, consisting of $38.5 billion from the General Fund, $12.1 billion from special funds, and $1.5 billion from bond funds. Compared with 1992-93, total state spending will decrease by $5.5 billion, or 9.6 percent. General Fund spending declines by $2.6 billion and spending from bond funds declines by $3.2 billion, while special fund spending increases slightly by $220 million. A major feature of the budget package is the adoption of the Governor’s proposal to shift $2.6 billion of property tax revenues from local governments to schools. This shift reduces the state’s education funding requirement under Proposition 98 by an equivalent amount.

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1993-94 Budget Enacted; Economic and Revenue Developments

July 1, 1993 - 1993-94 Budget Enacted; Economic and Revenue Developments

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Legislature Passes 1993-94 Budget

June 1, 1993 - Legislature Passes 1993-94 Budget

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Overview of the May Revision 1993-94

May 1, 1993 - On May 20th, the Administration issued the May Revision of the 1993-94 Governor’s Budget. As originally presented in January, the budget proposal addressed a budget gap that we estimated at $8.6 billion (please see The 1993-94 Budget: Perspectives and Issues, Part I ). Since the introduction of the original budget proposal, this gap has declined slightly. In contrast, the amount of savings that could be achieved from the original budget proposals has decreased by a much larger amount. While the May Revision does propose some additional spending reductions to partially replace these lost savings, the Administration proposes to roll over a deficit of $667 million into 1994-95. A major solution component continues to be a $2.6 billion local property tax shift. We conclude that, as currently structured, this property tax shift proposal is unworkable. It significantly reduces local (especially county) resources without a corresponding change in local responsibilities or a practical way to find replacement revenue in 1993-94.

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Cal Facts: California Economy and Budget in Perspective-1993

May 1, 1993 - Cal Facts: California Economy and Budget in Perspective

State Budget Condition Staff

Ann Hollingshead
(916) 319-8305
State Budget and Federal Funding
 
Carolyn Chu
(916) 319-8326
Chief Deputy Legislative Analyst