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Status Check: Accommodating Prison Population Growth

January 6, 1995 - The California Department of Corrections (CDC) projects that the state prison population will grow by almost 70 percent in the next five years. Much of this growth will be driven by enactment of the "Three Strikes and You're Out" legislation. Building new state prisons to accommodate this growth will be both challenging and costly. In this report, we discuss (1) the CDC's inmate population projections and new prison needs, (2) the current status of funding for prison construction and renovation, and (3) the state budget implications of accommodating growth in the state's prison population.

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The “Three Strikes and You’re Out” Law—A Preliminary Assessment

January 6, 1995 - The “Three Strikes and You’re Out” Law—A Preliminary Assessment

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Accommodating Prison Population Growth

January 6, 1995 - Accommodating Prison Population Growth

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LAO Annual Report Fiscal Year 1993-94

January 5, 1995 - LAO Annual Report Fiscal Year 1993-94

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New Funding Model for Special Education - The Development Process

January 1, 1995 - Presented To: Assembly Budget Subcommittee No. 2

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New Funding Model for Special Education - A Preliminary Report

January 1, 1995 - In February 1994 the Legislative Analyst's Office (LAO) in its Analysis of the 1994-95 Budget Bill cited a number of major problems with the state's current special education funding formula. Among the major shortfalls cited were (1) unjustified funding variations among local education agencies (LEAs), (2) unnecessary complexity, (3) constraints on local innovation and response to changing requirements, and (4) inappropriate fiscal incentives. Based on this analysis, the Legislature adopted language in the Supplemental Report of the 1994 Budget Act directing the State Department of Education (SDE), the Department of Finance, and the LAO to jointly review the Master Plan for Special Education (MPSE) and propose a new funding model by May 31, 1995.

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Redevelopment After Reform: A Preliminary Look

December 29, 1994 - This white paper reviews redevelopment activities undertaken between January 1993 and August 1994.

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California Defense Conversion: Technology Reinvestment Project

December 27, 1994 - To help California compete for grants under President's initiative for Defense Reinvestment and Conversion, the state set aside over $50 million in matching funds and established the Defense Conversion Matching Grant Program.

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California Update: The 1995-96 Budget Outlook

December 1, 1994 - In July 1994, a two-year plan was adopted for eliminating the budget deficit carried over from 1993-94 and bringing the state's budget back into balance by year-end 1995-96. On January 10, 1995, the Governor is scheduled to release his specific budget proposal for 1995-96. This update reviews the state's progress in implementing the budget plan based on recent developments. Currently, the state is running slightly ahead of scheduie in its two-year plan to eliminate the budget deficit. However, there are a number of budget risks and uncertainties that could worsen the outlook considerably and jeopardize achieving a balanced budget in 1995-96.

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California Update: The “Trigger” Mechanism

October 1, 1994 - As part ofthe 1994-95 budget package, the state put into place a so-called trigger mechanism. This mechanism was viewed as being necessary to ensure repayment of money borrowed from investors to finance the budget plan.

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The Federal Crime Bill: What Will it Mean for California?

September 27, 1994 - On September 13, 1994, President Clinton signed the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (the federal "crime bill"). This measure will have a variety of impacts on California.

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The President’s Welfare Reform Proposal: Fiscal Effect on California

August 11, 1994 - On June 14, 1994, President Clinton formally released his welfare reform proposal, generally designed to facilitate employment for AFDC recipients. This policy brief assesses the proposal's fiscal impact on California. It is a revised version of our July 7 report, based on more recent information.

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Rethinking Community School Funding

August 10, 1994 - Community schools are operated by County Offices of Education (COEs) as alternative instructional placements for about 18,500 pupils in grades 7-12 who, for various reasons, have not been successful in traditional school programs. Pupils referred to community schools by a county probation department-often termed "Type C" pupil-comprise about three-fourths of all community school pupils. The COEs receive a level of funding for Type C pupils, that is about $1,200 per pupil higher than the average level of funding received by school districts. The basis on which the state should grant the higher Type C funding level has been the subject of legislation and budget control language for several years.

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Bonds and the November 1994 Ballots

August 9, 1994 - Two bond measures totaling $1.2 billion will be considered by California voters in November. The Legislature soon must decide which, if any, additional general obligation bond measures to place on the November 1994 ballot. The following factors must be considered as the Legislature makes these decisions. (1) Tens of billions of dollars will be needed over the next five years to meet the state’s identified capital outlay needs; (2) Only $1.3 billion of previously authorized general; obligation bonds are available to address these needs; (3) How well the state addresses its capital outlay needs will influence the state’s future competitiveness and economic growth, and Californians’ quality of life; (4) the state’s annual debt burden has risen sharply in recent years. These debt costs are a direct trade-off to using General Fund monies for support of other state programs.

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Making Government Make Sense: Developing a Reform Proposal

July 21, 1994 - The California Constitution Revision Cornmission has identified as its first priority a review of the state and local government program and financing relationship. In 1993, the Legislative Analyst's Office proposed a model-called Making Govemment Make Sense (MGMS)-or restructuring this state and local government relationship. This handout describes the three-step approach we took in developing the MGMS model.