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Governor’s May Revision Update: Health Insurance Affordability Proposals


Report

[PDF] The 2019-20 Budget: The Governor's Individual Health Insurance Market Affordability Proposals

February 7, 2019 - This report provides our assessment of the Governor's proposals to (1) create a state requirement that most Californians purchase health insurance coverage (referred to as an "individual mandate") or pay a financial penalty and (2) use the revenues from this penalty to fund additional health insurance subsidies for households purchasing coverage through Covered California.

Report

The 2022-23 Budget: Health Care Access and Affordability

February 23, 2022 - This brief focuses on access to health insurance coverage and the affordability of health care costs. We (1) assess various Governor’s proposals intended to improve health care access and/or affordability—including expanding Medi-Cal eligibility to undocumented residents between ages 26, reducing Medi-Cal premiums to zero cost, establishing the Office of Health Care Affordability, and reducing the cost of insulin through a state partnership; (2) discuss options to improve affordability of health plans purchased through Covered California; and (3) highlight some key access and affordability challenges that remain to address.

Correction (2/24/22): Figure 2 - Number of undocumented residents has been corrected.

Handout

[PDF] Funding and Implementing Individual Health Insurance Market Affordability Policies

February 12, 2019 - Presented to: Assembly Health Committee, Assembly Budget Subcommittee No. 1 on Health and Human Services, Senate Committee on Health, and Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Subcommittee No. 3 on Health and Human Services

Post

The 2019-20 Budget: California Spending Plan—Health and Human Services

October 17, 2019 - From the General Fund, the 2019-20 spending plan provides $26.4 billion for health programs and $15.5 billion for human services programs—an increase of 18 percent and 12.6 percent, respectively, over estimated 2018-19 General Fund spending in these two policy areas. Major health-related policy actions include the reauthorization of a tax on managed care organizations (which will reduce the above-noted General Fund health spending by $1 billion, pending federal approval) and over $400 million General Fund for state-funded subsidies for health insurance purchased on the individual market through Covered California. Major human services-related policy actions include General Fund support to increase CalWORKS cash grants and most developmental services provider rates, and to restore previously reduced service hours in the In-Home Supportive Services program. The spending plan also reflects the deposit of $700 million into a safety net reserve (bringing its balance to $900 million) that can be used for future CalWORKs and/or Medi-Cal expenditures.

Report

Issues That Could Impact Californians' Health Care Coverage in 2023 and Beyond

December 16, 2022 - This brief looks at health care coverage in California; provides background on the drivers of the significant decline in the percentage of Californians without health care coverage over the last ten years; and discusses various issues that could impact the number of Californians with coverage, and how the type of coverage they have may change, in calendar year 2023 and beyond.

Handout

[PDF] Financing Considerations for Potential State Healthcare Policy Changes

February 5, 2018 - Assembly Select Committee on Health Care Delivery Systems and Universal Coverage.

2/5/18: Correction to Figure 3.

Report

The 2019-20 Budget: Overview of the Governor's Budget

January 14, 2019 - This report presents our office’s initial assessment of the Governor’s Budget. The budget’s position continues to be positive. With $20.6 billion in discretionary resources available, the Governor’s budget proposal reflects a budget situation that is even better than the one our office estimated in the November Fiscal Outlook. The Governor’s Budget allocates nearly half of these discretionary resources to repaying state liabilities. Then, the Governor allocates $5.1 billion to one-time programmatic spending, $3 billion to reserves, and $2.7 billion to ongoing spending. Although the Governor’s allocation to discretionary reserves represents a smaller share of resources than recent budgets, the Governor’s decision to use a significant share of resources to pay down state debts is prudent. The Governor’s ongoing spending proposal is roughly in line with our November estimate of the ongoing capacity of the budget under an economic growth scenario. This was just one scenario, however. Recent financial market volatility indicates revenues could be somewhat lower than either we or the administration estimated.

Handout

[PDF] What the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) Means for California

March 22, 2017 - Presented to Assembly Budget Subcommittee No. 1 On Health and Human Services and Assembly Health Committee

Handout

[PDF] Risks to Federal Health Care Funding

February 22, 2017 - Assembly Budget Subcommittee No. 1 on Health and Human Services

Letter

[PDF] Letter to the Honorable Bill Emmerson Regarding Bridge Plan

March 18, 2013 - Letter to the Honorable Bill Emmerson Regarding Bridge Plan.

Report

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Overview of Its Potential Impact on State Health Programs

May 13, 2010 - The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), often referred to as federal health care reform, is far-reaching legislation that will change how millions of Californians access health care coverage. We provide an overview of the new law and describe its implications for state health programs in the near term and the long term. We also recommend the Legislature think broadly about implementing PPACA and identify key issues to address including: (1) future costs for health programs, (2) whether structural changes to health programs are warranted, (3) whether PPACA should prompt a reevaluation of the state-local relationship, (4) new strategies that could bolster health care quality and outcomes, and (5) how future workforce and health infrastructure needs should be addressed.

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The 2020-21 Spending Plan: Health Budget and Policy

October 15, 2020 - From the General Fund, the 2020-21 spending plan provides $26.7 billion for health programs—an increase of 3 percent over estimated 2019-20 General Fund spending for these programs. The year-over-year net increase in General Fund spending is largely due to the projected COVID-19-related increase in the Medi-Cal caseload. The post describes major health-related actions (both policy actions and various budget adjustments) adopted by the Legislature as part of its 2020-21 spending plan. These actions include the offsetting of what would otherwise be General Fund costs with (1) revenues from the federally approved reauthorized tax on managed care organizations and (2) federal Medicaid funds that are being provided to the state at an enhanced level during the term of the public health emergency.

Letter

Health Care Reform

January 22, 2008 - We analyzed certain fiscal issues related to the health care reform (HCR) plan currently under consideration by the Legislature. We estimated the fiscal impact of HCR using two different assumptions of premiums: $250 per month per person and $300 per month per person. Under the $250 premium scenario there are sufficient revenues to support the program in the first year of operation (2010-11). However, by the fifth year of the program, annual costs exceed revenues by $300 million. Despite annual costs exceeding revenues in the fifth year, the program still has a positive cumulative fund balance because the collection of tobacco tax and employer fees start before program costs are incurred. Under the $300 premium assumption, costs exceed revenues by $122 million in the first year of operation and this shortfall increases to $1.5 billion by the fifth year of the program. In addition, the fund balance shows a deficit of almost $4 billion by the end of that period, even with the early collection of the tobacco tax and employer fees. In addition to the premium level, we have identified a number of other fiscal risks and uncertainties which could negatively affect the fiscal solvency of the plan by more than an additional $1.5 billion annually.

Handout

[PDF] Conference Committee Overview

May 30, 2019 - Presented to the Budget Conference Committee

Report

[PDF] The 2017-18 Budget: Analysis of the Medi-Cal Budget

March 9, 2017 - In California, the federal‑state Medicaid program is administered by the Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) as the California Medical Assistance Program (Medi‑Cal). Medi‑Cal is by far the largest state‑administered health services program in terms of annual caseload and expenditures. In this report, we provide an analysis of the administration’s caseload projections, including a discussion of the projected increases in ACA optional expansion caseload. We also provide an assessment of several aforementioned major factors affecting projected changes in Medi‑Cal spending in 2017‑18 and other policy changes proposed by the administration. These include the Governor’s proposed uses of Proposition 56 revenues, the proposal to shift additional New Qualified Immigrants (NQIs) to Covered California in 2017‑18, assumptions around federal CHIP funding, and the proposed abolition and transfer of the Major Risk Medical Insurance Fund (MRMIF).